Gypsum Office
Grand Junction Office / Mailing Address
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4720 Hwy 6
Gypsum, CO 81637
PO Box 2510
Grand Junction, CO 81502

(970) 471-4707

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  • Stanton Radon

Radon FAQ's



Q

What is radon?

A

Radon is a gaseous radioactive element produced by the decay of naturally occurring uranium found in soils throughout the world. It is extremely toxic, colorless, and is only detectable by specialized equipment. Every homeowner should test for radon.


Q

How does radon get into my home?

A

Radon moves from uranium-bearing granite deposits in the soil to the atmosphere. Your home sits on radon's pathway from the soil to the atmosphere. Since your home is usually warmer and has lower air pressure than the surrounding soil, gases in the soil, including radon, move into your home.


The most common routes are: 1) spaces between basement walls and the slab 2) cracks in foundations and/or walls. 3) openings around sump pumps and drains 4) construction joints and plumbing penetrations 5) crawl spaces and 6) well water with high radon concentrations.

Source: Colorado Department of Public Health & Environment


Q

How is radon measured?

A

The amount of radon in a home is measured in units of pCi/L (picocuries per liter). Testing is available from a variety by professionals including home inspectors and radon testing companies. Consumers may also purchase accurate and simple test kits from many hardware stores and other retailers. In each case testing is easy and inexpensive.


Q

How high is too high when it comes to radon levels?

A

The outside air averages 0.4 pCi/L while most structures contain higher levels. Levels in homes often range from a few pCi/L to well over a hundred in some cases. At 4.0 pCi/L the EPA recommends mitigation. At 20 pCi/L the risk of lung cancer becomes 35 times the risk of drowning. One of the highest recorded cases in Amercia measured 3700pCi/L in Pennsylvania. Radon is the leading cause of lung cancer in non-smokers.


Q

Why does my home have high radon levels?

A

The amount of radon in the soil depends on soil chemistry which varies from one house to the next. Radon propagates up through the ground and into your home through even the finest cracks and holes. Any home may have a radon problem. This means new and old homes, well-sealed and drafty homes, and homes with or without basements.

Each home must be tested individually to determine radon levels.


Q

How can radon levels be reduced?

A

Regardless of the size or type of home, radon levels can be reduced effectively and affordably by installing a well-designed radon mitigation system. We always recommend dealing with a NEHA/NRPP certified radon mitigation company. Refer to http://nrpp.info/ for more information. Stanton Radon (Stanton Engineering Solutions, Inc.) is fully certified.


Q

How much does radon mitigation typically cost?

A

The size, construction type, radon level, and a host of other variables are factored in to our detailed proposals. The best way to know what it will cost is to request your FREE ESTIMATE. Contact us now for a free quote on mitigating your home.


Q

How often should I test/retest?

A

The EPA recommends testing your home when first acquired and every 2 years thereafter. You should also retest after additions to your home or changes to the HVAC system. Radon levels will often become higher during the winter months. We include a free radon test kit with each installation.



Got a radon question? Give us a call: (970) 471-4707




Stanton Radon

www.stantonradon.com

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(970) 471-4707